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Metodi Hristov – ‘Dots’ EP Review

Metodi Hristov – ‘Dots’ EP Review

With a much anticipated return to Terminal M Records, Metodi Hristov has released the fierce ‘Dots’ EP. With this, label boss Monika Kruse expressed a sense of happiness in her press release, coining the term ‘funkyacidmetodilicious’.

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Hristov’s first release was ‘Aquarelberry’ in 2009. Released in Poland on ‘In Deep Records’, this nostalgic house number sparked an eight year stint of production, whirlwind DJ sets and a growing fame, from the underground to the London Overground Spotify listener.

Metodi Hristov has an illustrious production history. His 2014 release ‘Step Outside’ was cited by Moonharbour boss Matthias Tanzmann as the Number 1 record of that Ibiza season. Following on from this, Hristov has produced an expansive library of quality tracks, working his way up to production for some notable labels. Some of which include Toolroom Records, ViVa Music, Rejected and Gruuv. As well as being a highly respected producer, he has already formed a reputation for being a formidable DJ, having played globally to a growing acclaim. 2016-2017 marks a period of rapidly accelerating popularity for the DJ, highlighting the value of hard work in the dance music industry.

The future is dark, the future is techno.

With seven EPs added to his name this year, the Bulgarian producer showcases a range of genres, from house, tech-house to techno. He is able to manoeuvre through these with ease, revealing a flare for each. Many times, as on his latest ‘Dust’ EP, Hristov is able to demonstrate influences of all three through a trifecta of dance finesse. His repertoire has previously centered around tech-house. This is all good fun, as many a Martinez Brothers afterparty has shown, but now, with his eye fixed upon the future, Hristov has embraced the ominous kick drums and industrial percussion of techno.

With the entire EP sitting at 125 BPM, Metodi Hristov has created three techno monoliths. The first track,
‘Dots’ showcases a rolling baseline and menacing looped synths. There is a clear influence present, this being fellow Terminal M artists Pig & Dan. Dots continues with a series of sporadic claps which add weight and space to this track. There is a brief respite, that allows the track to demonstrate Hristov’s house influence with an oscillating bass and high hat pairing. However, this is soon reclaimed by the return of the menace of the looped synth.

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Metodi Hristov builds upon this track like a formula one car, stripping layers and building them up when necessary. With a range of percussion, Hristov champions minor alterations throughout the track that provide a nuanced energy shift. There is a core feeling of power emanating with this track, a dark power that is fit for 3am sets in dark halls. A perfect number to fit London’s Printworks.

The next track, ‘Sirius’ begins with intent, with each new layer building in intensity. Sharp hats and muted kick drums only serve to serenade a massive rolling baseline that is the cornerstone sound of this EP. The ordered nature of the percussive elements allow for a looseness in the addition of warped samples in Sirius. The contrast between tight and loose is a trademark Hristov sound. Whilst this track is weighty, it is a pause for breath after the title track ‘Dots’. In this sense, the track is slightly underwhelming in comparison. Yet, production quality is there, with Terminal M appearing the ideal home for the techno direction of Hristov.

The final number, ‘Prometheus’ begins with a spaced out baseline similar to that found on his 2013 ‘Too Much Pills’. As a result, Prometheus feels like an updated, heavier techno edition of the track. Typically raw, Prometheus adds an extra dimension of darkness to the EP. A notable feature of the three tracks on the Dots EP is the repetitive quality that evokes a trance like state in the listener. This allows the sample to emerge, almost from an ethereal realm, capturing minds and wreaking havoc across dance floors. Released during the height of the summer, this late July release has the potential to set August ablaze with full techno furry.

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